A Couple More Gems from my Video Game Collection

13 02 2008

I find myself with a little extra time before work, so I thought I would post (brag) a few pictures of two more little gems from my video collection.

We’ll start with a real rarity:NEC TurboDuo 16

This was the NEC Turbo Grafx 16 with integrated CD-ROM and a number of internal enhancements (including more system memory). Released in North America in October of 1992 with a price tag of $299 U.S., the system languished on shelves ($300 was way too expensive for a game system at that time). NEC tried to combat this by selling various bundles with a number of game pack ins. Even so, sales were dismal.

NEC beat Sony to the punch by releasing a CD-ROM based system a full two years before the Playstation invaded our homes. At the time, CD-ROMs were rare in computers, let alone game consoles.

Here’s a a look at my system:

TBD-System

TurboDuo, two controllers and multi-tap

TBD

The Console alone

TBD-Controller

Close up of one of the controllers

TBD-Multitap

The multi-tap. The system only had one controller port, but with the multi-tap up to four controllers could be used.

System Two: The Sega Game Gear

Sega released the Game Gear (hereon referred to as “GG”) in Japan in October 1990 and in North America in 1991. This was a hand held system designed to compete with Nintendo’s wildly popular Gameboy handheld system. The GG had some advantages over the Gameboy, namely a beautiful (for the time) colour screen (the Gameboy had a sickly looking green screen with the graphics displayed in grey).

One disadvantage was the fact that it ate batteries like crazy… and it took six AA batteries at a time. You were lucky to eek out five hours of game play with fresh alkaline batteries, compared to what seemed a lifetime of play (probably a couple of days) out of four AA batteries in the Gameboy. Sega tried to combat this with rechargeable, external battery packs that greatly increased the gameplay between charges, but also increased the bulk of the already large game system.

Despite the fact that this was a great little system (far superior to the original Gameboy, in my opinion), it was not accepted in Japan, and while a little more popular in Europe and North America, it was outsold by Nintendo’s Gameboy by a large margine. Nintedo continued to eat up the handheld market over the years. Eventualy, in 1997, Sega dropped support for the system.

Although I wouldn’t call this system rare, I definitely consider it collector worthy. With lots of add-ons and a ton of games to hunt down from a lot of markets (any GG game from any region will play on any GG), I always seem to find somethig new…well, new to me.

Here are some pictures of my collection:

GG

The Game Gear unit.

GG-bag

Official Sega Game Gear carrying bag

GG-Games

Some of my Game Gear games.

GG-TV-Tuner

The coveted Television tuner add-on. Note: This did not work with later releases of the Game Gear

GG-Magnifier

The “official” screen magnifier (there were quite a few third party versions of this).

GG-Game-Genie

The Game Gear Game Genie – a third party “cheat” device.

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2 responses

13 02 2008
xyliana

Wow the Game gear cracked me up… let the memories flood back

12 07 2013
release date of wii u

Whoa! This blog looks exactly like my old one! It’s on a entirely different topic but it has pretty much the same layout and design. Excellent choice of colors!

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